Maidenhead Bridge

Maidenhead Bridge is a Grade I listed bridge carrying the main traffic on the A4 road over the River Thames, it links Maidenhead in Berkshire with Taplow in Buckinghamshire.

The first bridge on this site was built of wood in 1280 in what was then the hamlet of South Ellington. The Great West Road to Reading, Gloucester and Bristol was diverted over the new bridge and the mediaeval town of Maidenhead then grew up. Within a few years a wharf was constructed next to the bridge and the South Ellington name was dropped. The area then became known as Maiden-Hythe, literally meaning “new wharf”.

The present bridge at Maidenhead was built in stone for Sir Robert Taylor in 1772, when tolls were introduced which continued until 1903.  It was the bridge at Maidenhead that brought prosperity to medieval South Ellington and its Maidenhithe wharf. Travellers found it a convenient stopping place and inns providing accommodation soon began to appear

In the 18th century, Maidenhead was a popular second stop on the popular A4 Bath Road out of London. It was one of the busiest coaching stops in the country. where up to 90 coaches a day passed through the town. The coaching inns were highly popular, especially at dusk, when coachmen refused to carry on over the infamous Maidenhead Thicket for fear of being held up by Robin Hood and his merry highwaymen.

Some views of the famous Maidenhead Bridge crossing the River Thames are below.

A beautiful sunny day for the Maidenhead Boundary Walk past the bridge
A beautiful sunny day for the Maidenhead Boundary Walk past the bridge
Rowers preparing their boats by Maidenhead Bridge
Rowers preparing their boats by Maidenhead Bridge
Bridge memorial plaque to floods of 1947
Bridge memorial plaque to the famous floods of 1947
Maidenhead Bridge at night time
Maidenhead Bridge at night time

Maidenhead Bridge provides the link between Maidenhead and Taplow, and the A4 crosses the bridge. Location below

3 Comments Add yours

Please leave us your comments below

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s